Hey there, friend! If you’re planning a visit to the enchanting land of a thousand lakes, vibrant northern lights, and the home of Santa Claus, it’s important to understand the local culture and customs to ensure a smooth and enjoyable experience. Finland is known for its warm-hearted people and breathtaking landscapes, but there are a few things you should steer clear of to stay out of trouble. Let’s dive into these cultural nuances, shall we?

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1. Personal Space is a Thing:

Finns value their personal space and are not exactly known for their extravagant displays of affection or small talk with strangers. It’s completely normal to enjoy silence on public transport or to maintain a comfortable distance when chatting. So, while you might be used to hugs and kisses as greetings, a simple nod and a smile will do the trick here.

2. No Jaywalking, Seriously:

Traffic rules are taken pretty seriously in Finland. Jaywalking can land you in hot water, or at least get you some disapproving looks. When the light’s red, wait patiently at the crossing. The locals certainly do, and you’ll fit right in.

3. Stay Sober in Public Places:

While enjoying a drink or two at a pub is fine, public drunkenness is a no-no. The Finnish police can be strict about this, and it’s best to keep the partying confined to appropriate venues. Enjoy responsibly, and remember that moderation is key.

4. Respect Sauna Etiquette:

Saunas are an integral part of Finnish culture, and they’re taken quite seriously. If you’re lucky enough to be invited to one, remember to embrace the nudity (it’s customary), but keep conversations light and avoid sensitive topics. Also, don’t forget to ask about the sauna’s specific rules – every sauna owner might have their preferences.

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5. Don’t Interrupt the “Silent Time”:

In Finland, there’s something called “Hiljainen Hetki” (silent time) that occurs daily, usually at 9 p.m. This is a moment of reflection, and it’s considered polite to lower your voice and avoid making loud noises during this time, especially in public spaces.

6. Avoid Prolonged Small Talk:

While Finns are warm and friendly, they’re not typically fans of prolonged small talk. Keep conversations concise and to the point. Asking questions about someone’s personal life too soon might come across as invasive, so take your time to build a connection.

7. Don’t Insist on Tips:

Unlike in many other countries, tipping isn’t a common practice in Finland. Service charges are usually included in bills, so there’s no need to leave extra money on the table. However, if you feel you’ve received exceptional service, a polite thank you is always appreciated.

8. Mind Your Volume:

Finnish cities are generally calm and quiet places. Speaking loudly in public areas or on public transportation might attract some disapproving glances. Embrace the tranquil atmosphere and keep the noise levels down.

9. Smoking Rules:

If you’re a smoker, be aware that smoking is prohibited in most indoor places, including bars and restaurants. Look for designated smoking areas and always dispose of your cigarette butts properly.

10. Always Remove Your Shoes:

When entering someone’s home, it’s customary to remove your shoes at the door. This helps keep the interiors clean and showcases your respect for their space.

So there you have it, dear friend! With these tips in mind, you’re well on your way to having a fantastic time in Finland without ruffling any feathers. Remember, it’s all about embracing the local customs and respecting the culture that makes this country truly special. Enjoy your trip!

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